What Can I Use Instead Of a Fondue Pot?

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What can I use as a fondue pot substitute?

Owning a fondue pot is wonderful because it increases convenience. However, not everyone has the luxury of having one in their kitchens.

You can use various easy ways to make a delicious and lump-free fondue without the traditional fondue pot.

If you do not own a fondue pot, you can improvise with a double broiler, crockpot fondue, thick-based pot, or oven broiling

What is a fondue pot?

This is a cookware consisting and a pot with a heat source below it. The heat source of this pot maybe cooking oil or electricity.

If you want a portable fondue pot go for one that fuel.

It is used to make fondue, a dish whereby small pieces of food are dipped into a hot cooking medium such as cheese, cooking oil, chocolate, wine, or other ingredients according to the food being prepared.

How to Make Fondue

The specific fondue ingredients ratio will depend on your favorite cheeses. However, the traditional choice is Swiss.

  • 4 cups of cheese
  • 2 tablespoon of cornstarch
  • 1 whole clove garlic but smashed
  • 1½ cups wine/beer

The acidity from wine helps in keeping the proteins from breaking up or denaturing. The cheese does not, therefore, become stingy or get into a mess.

The cornstarch adds protection for the cheese’s protein, ensuring perfect results without any flavor being added.

Top 4 substitutes for fondue Pots

  • Double Boiler

If you have all the ingredients but a fondue pot is missing, you can use one of the following to get the same gentle heat for your recipe.

A double boiler provides heat almost in a similar way as the actual fondue pot. Your ingred9ients are melted slowly by the boiling water around the bowl.

However, you must continuously stir as you add ingredients. Start with the garlic and wine and add a little amount of cheese at a time as you stir to prevent the formation of lumps.

  • Crockpot Fondue

A crockpot cooks slowly at low temperatures. You should put all the ingredients into the pot at the same time before turning on the heat. It cooks fondue better in high heat; cover it for about one hour and a half.

Ensure that you stir regularly after every fifteen minutes and remove the garlic once you stir once.

However, you should leave it uncovered as it cooks for the last few minutes. Uncover it in the last few minutes to let the excess moisture escape.

  • Thick-Based pot

A thick-based pot will work like a fondue pot, but the flame must be very low. Just like with a double boiler, add garlic and wine first.

Add the cheese as you stir out the lumps in every case. The thick-based method produces the best and most perfect results compared to other options.

  • Oven Broiling

When you want to make a melted cheese fix, the heat rule is the opposite. You use direct and quick heat, so your cheese is melted within a few seconds.

However, food should be eaten immediately. This method does not emulsify cheese and wine. Therefore, you end up with a baked cheese dip.

Frequently asked questions

  1. Can I add water to my fondue pot?

Yes, you can add water to your fondue pot because it should never be empty. You can also use some oil, but you should not add anything cold once the pot heats up.

  1. Is one fondue pot enough for me?

Yes, one fondue pot is enough, but several will not harm. This is important because it allows you to have several sizes. Most virgin pots can accommodate up to six dippers, which enables you to explore various fondue recipes.

  1. Which oil is ideal for my fondue pot?

The best oil for your fondue pot is mono-saturated oil. Good examples include canola oil and virgin olive oil.

Canola oil comes with a high smoke point and has almost no flavor, and pure olive oil has a higher smoke point than canola because it has no impurities.

Conclusion

Apart from oven broiling, other alternatives of a fondue pot require you to use low heat.

Anything more substantial can ruin your recipe, such as making the cheese to size up, failing to emulsify with the wine, burning the cheese, and causing the proteins to break up, causing lumps.

You can be more creative with any of the above methods by varying the flavors. Besides, you can get a different type of cheese like e sharp cheddar. Try also to use beer instead of wine.

Nothing should stop you from making comfort foods during fall, not even lack of a fondue pot.

The above alternatives will give you a lump-free and delicious fondue just like you would with the traditional equipment.

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